Favourites Friday #71: Old New Favourites

A little nostalgia hurt no one. Or at least that’s what I’ve been telling myself.

71

This week, as I’ve been loading up on audiobooks for my car and trying to get the most out of my library card, I have been taking a trip down memory lane with all the books that made up my adolescence. Whether they helped me through a tough time, or simply made me laugh, it’s been nice to revisit them as an adult.Read More

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Your #InternationalWomen'sDay Book List

Today is International Women’s Day, and I am so proud to be standing side-by-side with so many amazing women in this world. Everyone deserves a voice, and it is a day like today that reminds us what a voice women have.

Some of these voices are shown in literature in amazing feminist books that everyone should read. They make us laugh, they inspire us to action, or they tell a story of exactly what life has been like for women in the past. I hope you will take time during Women’s History Month and read a few.

#InternationalWomensDay Book List

*Note: These books are only a few of great books that I’ve read (that are more mainstream), there are many more out there (that are amazing and just not as popular on Barnes & Noble shelves) and I encourage you to open up your library like I will be doing this month.Read More

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The Social Media Tag (aka, Book Bragging)

A few weeks ago (yeah, I’m really behind on my organization) I was tagged by Sabrina from Books and Bark in the Social Media Tag. This tag is cool and different and I thought, “Hey, let’s reconnect with those books you’re always attempting to write.”

Last summer I gave myself the challenge to write an entire book. And, oddly enough, I actually accomplished that goal. It took until the very last day of summer (to be finished right before 12am) but it’s a real thing now. And definitely one of the more mature pieces I’ve ever written in terms of writing. I’ve chosen this novel for the tag. Let’s begin!

The Social Media Tag
(Or Where We Shamelessly Discuss My Book)

Twitter
Describe your plot in 140 characters or less.

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And I Will Always Love You, Seamus Finnigan

On Sunday, another article from me was published on Huffington Post. I’m not going to lie, this one is definitely something funny and goofy and if it doesn’t make you giggle a bit, you are reading it wrong.

In this post I defend secondary characters in books and how fantastic they are, along with my favorite, Seamus Finnigan. I have, and always will be, an enthusiast, and this article is an enthusiast’s way to defend characters.

Below I have posted the teaser and I hope you like it and start to see Seamus Finnigan (and other fantastic secondary characters) a different way.

AND I WILL ALWAYS LOVE YOU, SEAMUS FINNIGAN

BY MORGAN HEGARTY

At some point we have fallen in love with the main character of a book or film. These characters are designed to draw the audience in, of which they do a fantastic job. And while we fawn over these characters and paste them on our walls, we forget some of the most priceless characters of the films, the ones we really should be crushing on.

The secondary characters.

I have been in love with Seamus Finnigan since I was six years old. That is when I read my first Harry Potter book, and the first film came out, and I was introduced to my absolute favorite secondary character.

All the other kids were going on and on about Harry Potter and how cool he was, “The Chosen One.” But no one seemed to notice the absolute brilliance that was Seamus Finnigan. He is the kid who blows things up (usually blasting off his eyebrows) and has this adorable Irish accent. If you weren’t in love with Seamus Finnigan when I was six, I didn’t think we could be friends. CONTINUE READING THE ARTICLE HERERead More

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Books I Know You’ll Love

You know what I haven’t done in a while? Recommendations!

I built this blog on talking about the things I enjoy and I haven’t made lists of books or movies that I suggest you read/watch. Let’s change that, yeah?


I’ve been very bad this summer. While I usually spend most of it curled on the couch or on a towel reading novel after novel, I have failed to do so this summer. Maybe it’s because it’s uncomfortably hot or that I am finally finding other ways to occupy myself during the summer. But that’s not a valid excuse as I love reading and I have spent far too much time not losing myself in a good book.

In high school I did a lot of reading. Books that made me laugh, cry, etc. So I now present to you my master list of books that I am taking with me to university because I never want them to leave my sight, they are that good. I hope you will give these books a chance and if you do end up reading them or have read them, give me a comment or shoot me an email (teenenthusiasm@gmail.com) and we can have a chat about them!

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John Green Got it Right

If you’ve been following my vague tweets all week, you’ll know that what I want to discuss today isn’t all laughs and squeaks. It’s something that has affected my life and all my classmates lives and many more in my community. It’s something that I’ve wanted to discuss for a while now, but haven’t had the motive to until now. Today isn’t all about laughs. I want to do something I rarely do: Be serious.

Cancer.

The very word makes you shiver. You can feel the negative connotation. It’s this word that has taken many from us and will continue for quite a while.

About four years ago a girl in my class was diagnosed with cancer. For these four years she has fought bravely and has been an inspiration to us all. Monday morning my teachers announced that she had passed away. There was not one person in the Senior class who had the pleasure of having class with her who didn’t feel…broken inside.

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My Book Recommendations

On Twitter, Facebook, and even comments on here, I am always asked what books I like to read? What’s my favorite romance novel? Harry Potter or Hunger Games? So, to get it all over in one fell swoop, here are my book recommendation based on questions you’ve asked me.

Favorite Book Series

The Harry Potter series

Best Novel About High School

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

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Reading-Induced Laughter

When I was 14, I wrote a novel. And not an all-great American novel, or a heroic story of people surviving an apocalypse novel. It was a girly, frilly novel.

The other day I was looking through some of the documents on the laptop, seeing which ones I could delete and which ones I should keep. As I perused all my old English assignments and random GIFs, I noticed the novel I’d written at 14. My first reaction was to delete it, remove it completely from any memory and hard drive. My second reaction was to read it, which I did.

I will say this. I thank the heavens that I have taken several English classes since then. It’s not that it had any bad grammar or atrocious spelling mistakes. It was that it was poorly written, had no plot twist or climax, and I spent way too much time describing clothing and too little time describing important events. Plus, I had a bit too much fun making up IM screen names. 14-year-old me was a failure as a respectable novelist.Read More

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The Great Thing About Books

As many of the nerds of the world will tell you, books are great things. They are magical collections of pages that transport the reader sitting in their bedroom to fabulous places where anything can happen.

Reading a book is like getting on an airplane. You start in a place you know, but as you get into the air, you have no way of knowing what’s going to happen, if you’ll even end up at your expected landing spot. Books are mysterious like that. I like it.

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‘Huck Finn’: Wrong to Lie

Last year, NewSouth Books released a copy of “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain with the n-word removed. This particular account of censorship caused uproar and, well, I’m uproaring with the best of them.

I am currently reading “Huck Finn” in my AP Language & Composition class. The pre-Civil War satirical novel about a young boy who runs away from his abusive drunk of a father and ends up travelling with a fugitive slave is one of the best books about racism I have ever read. The novel pokes fun at the racist South in an indirect way, Twain getting his point across without writing it in black and white. He also uses the correct slang of the time period, the n-word included, to tell the story in the most historically-correct form he could.

There is an ever growing list of why people don’t like the slang inside “Huck Finn”.

  • It’s racist!
  • It’s offensive!
  • It’s an awful word!
  • Our children should not be allowed to read this!

But the truth is, if you change the words in a book, it isn’t truly by the original author anymore. Take a book, for my example I will use “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green, and change any 30 words you want. Is it still John Green’s book? No. You have changed some of the words he spent hours writing and now the book has two authors, you and him. By changing the words, you are not protecting innocent eyes, you are changing the words people spent months, even years, writing to make it perfect to their vision.

Another rising issue with changing the words is about our children, the next generation. Right now, we know the language used in “Huck Finn” and although we aren’t comfortable with it, we know that that’s how people in pre-Civil War times talked about African Americans. By taking out the racial slur, our kids won’t get to have this same knowledge. They won’t know that “Huck Finn” was changed. By taking out one simple word, well, it could change how a whole generation looks at the Civil War, and the racism, and even misinterpret certain parts of history, just because we find it offensive even though it was not meant offensively.

All in all, by changing the words of “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” just to be more 21st century racial conscious, are we really doing what is best for ourselves and the generations to come? I’ve told you my stance, but I want to hear yours. Please comment below.

P.S. another great article to read on this subject is http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2011/01/censoring_huck_finn_wrong_wron.html