My NaNoWriMo Strategy

It’s November, which means NaNoWriMo!

If you’re unfamiliar, NaNoWriMo is short for National Novel Writing Month. Writers around the world join together to write 50,000+ words of their novel in 30 short days. It’s a rush of adrenaline, stress, and complete madness. But as a writer, I love it.

Because NaNo is so high intensity for a writer (you do the work of months/years in only one month) it’s important to have strategies for making it work. As this is my first time (after years of putting it off) I’ve still written several novels. So I’ve taken my novel writing strategies, streamlined them, and now I’m going to share how I’m going to survive NaNoWriMo 2015!

NaNoWriMo Survival Strategy Guide

1. Outline first

You’re going to waste all your writing time in those first few days if you’re outlining. That’s why outlining first is so important. Spend a few days (for me, I did it between classes) and get your chapters together, storyboard characters, and know your plot. It’s going to make all the difference.

2. Write in Google Docs/online platform

When writing novels, this is where I usually make my biggest mistake. I save my novel on my laptop and can only write it there. But when you save your novel on an online platform, like Google Docs, you can write it anywhere as long as you have an Internet connection. This has helped so much when I’m at the library or just in-between classes in the computer lab. It’s going to help you get your word count in easy.

3. Plan your word count

If you just tell yourself that you’re going to write, you’ll find yourself getting to 800 words and being tired. But if you tell yourself you’re going to write 2,000 words and won’t stop until you do, then you’re going to write 2,000 words. That goal is going to get you to 50,000 words a lot quicker.

4. Don’t edit

If you edit your story as you’re writing it, you’re taking precious writing time away from yourself. Don’t edit until after you hit your 50,000 word count. It’s kind of like they say, write drunk edit sober. Write crazy in 30 days, take a while to edit.

5. Time yourself

This tip actually comes from writing essays in high school. Tell yourself you’re going to write for an hour, no breaks. You’ll find the longer you’re writing, the more you get into it. By the time your hour is up, you’ll already be so into it you’ll finish whatever you’re working on. Definitely try this if you struggle getting into writing.

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Happy writing!

Stay classy, Internet,

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4 thoughts on “My NaNoWriMo Strategy

  1. I fully plan on working on NaNoWriMo this year, my first ever, but I’m not going to use it to get to 50,000 words. 50,000 words would not even give me anywhere near a book length manuscript as the creators claim, but besides that, I think the importance of the month should be on working on writing every day, even if that writing isn’t fiction, but creative nonfiction in my case.

    I hope you’re well!

    Tyler Ramage
    tylerramage.com

    1. Tyler,

      I completely agree with you on the point being to write every day. I believe the 50,000 word count is mostly to motivate people who are set on a goal. People can even make their own word count. For me, my book will do well with a 50,000 word count first draft. These novels aren’t made to be final drafts in any way, so I definitely think making your own goal on your own word count/type of draft is a good way to do NaNo.

      I hope you’re well too!

      Morgan

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