Fame Didn't Change Me, It Made Me

There was a  point last month where I realized something. I had, in some small way, made it big.

It started with my couple journeys to being Freshly Pressed and moved onto my articles on Huffington Post Teen. From there, it was the influx of Twitter followers, closely followed by the vast number of blog subscribers I was accumulating every day. It was an insane amount of people coming into my life, and I wasn’t sure how to react.

I hate to call this fame, but in a way it is. Writers and bloggers aren’t celebrated in the same ways as actors or vloggers. We are subtle in our art and rarely truly celebrated for our work. It’s not that we aren’t appreciated, it just isn’t done with people making Twitter accounts using our names.

Since I was a child I’ve imagined what it would be like to be famous. At the age of 14 I was so obsessed with this idea that I wrote a novel based off of my own conceptions about the whole ordeal. But actually being recognized by people, I didn’t react the way I had thought. While I had thought I would make me feel self-righteous and fabulous, it had a rather different effect on me.

At first I was confused. Why were there people reading my humble writing, the stuff I just pop out when I feel the urge? Had someone recognizable in the writing community talked about me? Was I being featured somewhere? But there was no link to describe it all.

Then there was the embarrassment. What if someone reads my fangirl post? I am going to die if everyone learns about my weakness for dimples. What if someone really nasty leaves a comment over my enthusiasms? It would break me.

Last, but not least, was the pride. Not the pride of being the most fabulous goat in the pasture, but of being told I had actual talent. While I was under the impression I would go power-hungry, I had actually made me stronger as a person. I had newfound confidence in my writing, that what I was writing wasn’t complete rubbish. As a person I felt like I had something of worth to offer the world. And it was a game changer.

Fame is a word for being recognizable. It is associated with being big-headed and moronic, thinking that one can get away with something someone not famous cannot. But it’s not. It is the recognition that prompts people to become more confident in what they produce. It is a pat on the back saying, “Hey, you have your name out there, go do something with it.”

Fame didn’t change me, as I had predicted. Fame made me into an impenetrable fortress of writing.

And it’s going to stay that way.

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I hope you enjoyed this post! I’ve had so much writer’s block this week and this was the one thing I felt strongly enough about to elaborate on. I want to thank you all so much for your support in my writing career and for making me feel like a tiny celebrity. Before I know it, people will be asking me to kiss their babies!

Update: Today is the launch of a new segment, “Advice with Morgan & Ella.” You can find out all about it in the pages (titled “Enthusiast Advice”) above. My friend Ella and I are starting an advice column, in which you can send in your questions/quandaries/problems, and we will be happy to assist you!

This is my first blog post on my gorgeous new Cormac the MacBook and the two of us are working so well together I think I’m going to be in this relationship for the long haul. I head back to school tomorrow (cue children crying) and he and I will be working very closely together as the term starts and I work on writing/school/job/life.

As always, let me know what you think and subscribe if your heart desires it!

Stay classy, Internet,

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