The Conflict of Content

I was sat in my J201 lecture today and my professor said something that made me think and immediately rush home after lecture to write down my thoughts on the topic because I had to share this with someone.He said,

“What makes a journalist? How is a writer for the New York Times different from your everyday blogger? What makes some content more important than others?”

And it totally puzzled me.

Here I am, an eighteen-year-old blogger with hopes of becoming a journalist and writing about every imaginable topic and I can’t even answer the question of whether hard news or me discussing my thoughts on dorm food is actual journalism content.

Here’s the thing about writing for a blog: You have creative control. Depending on my mood, I can write about my thoughts on Obamacare or how I am a firm believer that I have a posh British lady living inside me. There is absolutely no limit, which is why it can be difficult to write a blog post. There are no restrictions, and with that freedom comes the pressure of wanting to create content that people will enjoy.

Each week I ask my readers to send in ideas for blog posts they would like to read. It isn’t because I am too lazy to come up with my own topic, but because I want to create content that I know you will enjoy. With a long list ranging from A-Z, there are so many opportunities to write something that none of my readers will enjoy. So I ask and hope that whatever I write will create joy in at least a handful.

The content that a writer creates is like their baby. And when people criticize your content it hurts. Which is why we strive to write something that people will compliment and like. So I have to ask who is determine which is more important content: hard-hitting news or a person’s opinion? Does it matter on which is more relevant to the world or on how the person who is reading it feels?

Personally I feel the content that is important is that which interests the reader. You can hand me a well-written article about business in Libya but I’m not going to consider that important because I have no interest in that, even though it is relevant to the world and is education. But if you give me an semi-well written article on how social media has decreased study habits in students, I will devour it because it is of interest to me.

Overall, to answer my professor’s question, what makes a journalist is a person who writes. And the writing that is considered important is what the reader finds important. Both Anderson Cooper and I are journalists and people will differ on who writes more important articles.

Can this blog post please be considered my term paper, Dr. Chavez?

Stay classy Internet,

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